SLOW DOWN AND CATCH UP WITH GOD

A friend recently recommended this short documentary on pastoral ministry following Matt Canlis, who is now the Lead Pastor of Trinity Church in Wenatchee, WA.

If you are in ministry, set aside time to watch this beautifully produced and thoughtful film on the nature of pastoral ministry featuring Eugene Peterson and N.T. Wright.

Sometimes, we need to slow down in order to catch up to God.

You can watch the film here. Visit the film’s website for more materials.

HUNGARY MISSION TRIP (2019)

For several years now, our church family has partnered with Baptists on Mission to work with local missionaries in Hungary. Our commitment to Nagyhalász, Hungary was solidified when we sent out a Fairview member to work among that people group. Because of our consistent work in the area, God has allowed our teams to lead English Bible Camps in a local school, and we have seen many children and adults repent of their sin and place their faith in Jesus Christ.

God willing, I will travel with a team from our church to teach Bible in the local schools in June-July. I am writing to humbly ask that you would be willing to pray for this endeavor, and consider supporting this mission trip financially. I am trying to raise around $2,000 by the end of May to cover the cost of this mission endeavor. If you feel led to give toward this mission, you can make a check out to:

Fairview Baptist Church

5608 Ten Ten Road, Apex, NC 27539

Put Matt Capps/Hungary in the memo line.

Or, you can give online at fairviewchurch.org/give by giving to the Hungary Trip and placing Matt Capps in the comment section.

Thank you so much for your consideration. I appreciate your prayers as we go to minister among the people in Nagyhalász, Hungary, and provide support to our missionaries in the area.

HOW THE TRINITY SHAPES THE LIFE OF THE CHURCH

An excerpt from my latest article at Credo Magazine:

“British theologian Colin Gunton once argued that one shortfall of modern ecclesiology derives from the fact that it has rarely been rooted in the conception of the Triune God. This observation is worth consideration. I would argue that the unity of the Triune God, even as each member is distinct in his function to accomplish the plan of redemption provides a framework by which we can understand the unity and the mission of the church.

One might even argue that we cannot formulate a proper ecclesiology without reference to the doctrine of the Triune God. For the purpose of this article, I will utilize three of the primary New Testament metaphors for the church, namely, the people of God, the body of Jesus Christ, and the temple of the Holy Spirit, to build a framework for a Trinitarian ecclesiology. Perhaps a more comprehensive understanding of how the doctrine of the Trinity informs our ecclesiology might nourish a more holistic understanding in at least two particular areas, namely, the unity and mission of the church.”

Click here to read the whole thing.

GOSPEL UNITY OVER CULTURAL UNIFORMITY (GALATIANS 2:1-10)

This sermon was preached at Fairview Baptist Church on January 20, 2019. To view the entire series on Galatians, click here.

PAUL THE EVANGELIST (GALATIANS 1:10-24)

This is the second sermon in a series on Galatians preached at Fairview Baptist Church. To listen to the entire series, visit this page.

THE GOSPEL OF GRACE AND PEACE (GALATIANS 1:1-9)

The first sermon in a series on Galatians at Fairview Baptist Church in Apex, NC.

A CHRISTIAN APPRECIATION OF ART

My latest article at Tabletalk:

Andrew Wyeth, one of America’s most renowned realist painters of the twentieth century, had an uncanny ability to capture the solemn nature of the rural American life with painstakingly controlled brushstrokes and a muted color palette. One of Wyeth’s most intriguing and iconic paintings is titled Christina’s World (1948). The central focus of the work is a brunette female lying in a field with her left hand struggling toward her far-off farmhouse. The figure in the painting is modeled after Wyeth’s neighbor, Anna Olson. Olson suffered from a degenerative muscular disorder that limited her to crawling around her house and family land.

There is nothing loud or wildly fantastic about the subject matter of Christina’s World. The power of the painting is held in what might be called the familiar whisper of beauty, a sense of the deep struggle in longing for home. It is a whisper that we cannot ignore. Like Christina’s World, beautiful art is never viewed with indifference. As philosopher Roger Scruton has noted, “Beauty demands to be noticed; it speaks directly to us like the voice of an intimate friend.” There is a sense in which all good art gives a certain voice to beauty. As C.S. Lewis reminds us in The Weight of Glory, beauty and art point beyond themselves. Beauty comes through as “the scent of a flower we have not found, the echo of a tune we have not heard, news from a country we have never yet visited.”

Read the rest of the article here.