Posts filed under ‘The Southern Baptist Convention’

Mission Trip Support (2018)

Mission Trips

The past year at Fairview Baptist Church has been inspiring for many reasons! God has been so gracious to us as a church family. One of the most exciting developments in the life of our church family has been the intentional strengthening of partnerships with church planters and missionaries. This means that we will be taking more mission trips, more often, with more people. I would love your support in order to go on several of these trips.

Mission Trip to Hungary (July 7-16): In Hungary, our team will lead an English Bible Camp in a local school in partnership with Alicia Jones, a Fairview church member who serves as a full-time missionary in the area. During this week-long camp, I will be teaching the Bible and explaining the gospel to hundreds of students. We will also have the opportunity to visit and encourage Christians among the Roma people group. Support for the Hungary trip is due by May 7th, 2018. The cost for each participant is $1,975.

Mission Trip to New York City (July 29-31): In New York, our team will serve alongside NAMB church planters Edwin Pacheco at Redemption Church in Brooklyn and Eric Hoke at All Saints Church in the Bronx. We will be leading sports camps, student tutoring camps, serving the elderly in the community as well as a variety of different activities that will support the mission of these churches to minister the Gospel to their communities. Support for the New York trip is due by May 13th, 2018. The cost for each participant is $500.

Mission Trip to Southeast Asia (October): In Southeast Asia, we will be working alongside a family that we sent out from our church over a year ago. The details of this trip are yet to be worked out, however, it is possible that we will be distributing books and teaching English in a local school. The cost for each participant will probably be around $1,500.

Will you consider supporting me in these mission efforts?

First, you can participate in prayer. A prayer-less mission team cannot effectively reach the lost or encourage other believers.

Second, as you pray, some of you may also want to help financially. I am praying that God will raise up a group of people to help offset a portion of the total cost. Would you prayerfully consider giving? A gift of $50, $75, $100, or more would be extremely helpful!

If you do decide to assist, there are two ways to give:

Give by Check: support checks should be made out to Fairview Baptist Church with one of the trips or persons in the memo line, and be mailed to 5608 Ten Ten Road, Apex NC 27539.

Give Online: You can also give online at fairviewchurch.org/give. If you give online, make sure you note my name and the trip in the comments section.

All gifts are tax deductible. Also note, if any individual on the team raises more support than needed, the surplus will be used to offset others on the team or to help with ground costs during the trip. Thank you for your prayerful consideration.

April 9, 2018 at 11:05 am Leave a comment

My Sermon Preparation Process

Books

Preparing a sermon week after week is a lot of work. Preaching a sermon week after week is also a pure joy. This past week I posted pictures of my sermon preparation process on Twitter, and several pastors and church leaders commented that it was helpful for them. I figured I would publish this blog post with a little explanation for each step.

Step 1: Examine The Text Itself

Initial

I typically plan my sermon text weeks or months ahead of time. This not only helps me plan and prepare adequately, it also allows our pastor for worship plan the entire service in light of the text.

Very early in the week I will prayerfully and attentively read the text several times, and ask questions of the text. I look for repeated words. I look for phrases or statements that need clarification or seemed to be emphasized by the writer. During this step, I typically use resources in the original languages in a very specific way, namely, to dig deeper on certain words or illuminate my understanding of certain phrases in the passage. My main goal is to understand what the text says as best I can.

Step 2: Divide The Text Into Units And Dig Deeper 

Divide

Usually, the English translations of the Bible have helpful paragraph divisions that allow us to understand units of thoughts or movement in the narrative. Are there specific scenes or rational arguments that move the reader from point A to point B? If so, that is an indication of how one might break the sermon up into points? Commentaries are helpful at this step. The biblical scholars who write commentaries typically show how the text unit is divided in a literary sense.

At this step, I also read certain portions or commentaries in order to shape the language I use to explain the text. As for the use of commentaries, I try and read several scholarly hermeneutical commentaries, application-focused homiletical commentaries, and books related to the text or topic.

Step 3: Articulate The Main Point And The Subpoints Of The Sermon

Outline

I like to have the sermon outlined by Wednesday if possible. Not only does this lock me into a sermon structure, it also allows me to send the outline to the AV Team in order to produce the sermon points for Sunday as well as the Kids Director to produce the Kids Listening Guides.

The main point of the sermon is a sentence that I repeat several times throughout the sermon. In other words, when someone leaves after hearing the sermon – my goal is to have this point seared into their minds and hearts. The subpoints either serve as support of the main point or simply indicate movement in the narrative or argument of the text.

Step 4: Develop The Applications and Illustrations Of Each Subpoint

Application

This past week, I used the application grid that has been produced by Mark Dever of 9 Marks Ministries. What I like about this application grid is that it forces me, as the preacher, to apply the text to the different groups of people that may be in the room.

For many pastors, application and illustration are the most difficult parts of sermon preparation. This portion of sermon preparation requires that you try and anticipate, as best you can, the thoughts, questions, struggles, and needs of your listeners. At this point, my goal is to press in and pray that God would provide conviction, comfort, or confidence in the listener.

I have also found it helpful to read or listen to living trusted preachers throughout the week while walking, driving or working in the yard. Often times, God uses other brothers to help clarify the explanation of the text or shape my own applications or illustrations.

Step 5: Write The Sermon In Its Entirety

I preach from a manuscript. This allows me to remain extremely focused as I preach. Therefore, I begin with my outline, and then work to clarify my explanation of the text. After these sections of the sermon are filled in, I then go back in and add the applications and illustrations. I do all of this, making sure that I restate the main point of the sermon in each section.

The last stage of preparation before printing and delivering the sermon is adding the introduction and conclusion. It is only after the completion of the body of the sermon that I am prepared to frame the sermon with initial and concluding thoughts. As an expository and theological preacher, my goal is to walk people through the biblical text in order that God’s word can be clearly understood. Where the Word of God is properly taught; when the Spirit of God opens the heart; the voice of God is properly heard.

I always ask, how many times will people hear the good news of the gospel during the service in its entirety? How many times will I proclaim the gospel and call for a response during my sermon? Could my sermon be preached as is, if Jesus did not rise from the grave? If not, my sermon is not distinctively Christian.

Step 6: Print And Preach

Sermon

Once again, I write all of my sermons in manuscript/bullet point form. I typically shoot for 8-10 pages in size 12 font. When I print the sermon, I print it horizontally with two columns. This allows me to fold each page in half and punch holes for a 5-1/2 x 8-1/2 binder. I own one of these genuine leather sermon notebooks, and I love it.

Finally, before I preach, I humbly realize that all of my efforts are feeble unless God opens the hearts of the hearers under my voice. While I pray for clarity of thought and sensitivity to the Spirit throughout the preparation process, before the moment of preaching I pray that everyone within the sound of my voice will understand the text clearly, and be sensitive to the Spirit as He calls them to respond.

I am certainly no expert in preaching or sermon preparation. However, I have found this process helpful in the weekly ministry of preaching. Hopefully, you have found something here helpful. We all have our patterns and practices. If you are a pastor, how do you prepare? I would love to learn from you as well.

Here is the video of this particular sermon at Fairview Baptist Church in Apex, NC.

April 1, 2018 at 11:10 pm Leave a comment

Parable of the Two Lost Sons (Luke 15:11-32)

This is the latest sermon from a series I am preaching at Fairview Baptist Church.

February 22, 2018 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

The Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37)

This is the second sermon in a series on the Parables of Luke from Fairview Baptist Church, Apex

February 6, 2018 at 10:01 am Leave a comment

The Parable of the Soils (Luke 8:4-15)

On Sunday we began a new series on the Parables of Luke at Fairview Baptist Church.

January 29, 2018 at 7:00 am Leave a comment

Should Women Serve As Deacons In Southern Baptist Churches?

women.jpg

I am currently preaching through the book of 1 Timothy at Fairview Baptist Church. This morning we examined the qualifications of pastors/elders and deacons from 1 Timothy 3:1-13. During this particular sermon, I argued the following:

“Based on Scripture, I do believe it’s possible for women to serve as deacons in some settings.”

This statement flowed from an exegetical study, and a willingness to reexamine my own assumptions, presuppositions, biases, historical understandings, and personal filters. I am conservative in my theology. To some people, a statement like the one above is often associated with moderate or liberal Baptists.

Therefore, I would like to explain why I believe this can be the case from Scripture, and then consider how church context plays into the discussion.

The Biblical Evidence

There are basically two schools of thought. Good conservative Bible-believing scholars and pastors differ on this complex issue. Therefore, I think we should be careful by approaching it with wisdom and grace.

In 1 Timothy 3:8-13 Paul lays out the qualifications for deacons. In general, I would argue that deacons provide leadership in the service-oriented and administrative matters pertaining to the physical needs of the church (Acts 6:1-4). This is important for the qualifications listed in 1 Timothy 3:8-13, in the sense that deacons serve in areas like finances (1 Tim. 3:8), administration (1 Tim. 3:12), visitation (1 Tim. 3:11), and meeting to the needs of the church family (Acts 6:1-4).

In reference to women serving as deacons, the debate centers around verse 11 and its surrounding context, namely, does Paul mean deacons wives, deacons along with their wives, or women serving as deacons? Consider a few translations:

  • “In the same way, their wives are to be women worthy of respect, not malicious talkers but temperate and trustworthy in everything” (NIV).
  • “Their wives likewise must be dignified, not slanderers, but sober-minded, faithful in all things” (ESV).
  • “Wives, too, must be worthy of respect, not slanderers, self-controlled, faithful in everything” (CSB).
  • “Women must likewise be dignified, not malicious gossips, but temperate, faithful in all things” (NASB).

One of the first things you will notice is that the text, depending on the version, translates this verse as “their wives”, “wives too”, or “women”. First, the pronoun “their” is actually not in the Greek, the original language of the New Testament. Some Bible translators argue that it is implied, but it’s certainly not explicit. Therefore, we must admit there is some ambiguity here. Even still, it is very possible that the best translation for verse 11 is not “their wives”, but wives or women. It seems that Paul is referring to women in general or married women (wives).

Some have argued that Paul is referring to deacons as a married couple (male and female) serving together in this office. Both husband and wife could inevitably be involved in the deacon ministry to some extent and, therefore, needed to be of good Christian character. However, the absence of the pronoun “their” (as in “their wives”) makes this interpretation less likely.

The second thing to notice is the adverb “too” or “likewise”. This is important for the context. The argument is, Paul begins by addressing deacons in general, switches the attention to women in verse 11, and then to men in verse 12 (one woman man, the leader in the home), and back to deacons in general in verse 13. Paul used the word “too/likewise” in order to transition from talking about elders in verse 7 to talking about deacons in verse 8. Paul then used this same word “too/likewise” in verse 11 to transition into talking about wives or women. The more natural reading of the original language is first pastors/elders (men) likewise, to deacons likewise.

Third, why does Paul not give qualifications for pastor/elders wives? After giving specific responsibilities for male elder’s in the home (1 Timothy 3:1-7), why is there no mention of their wives?

Fourth, some may argue that based on Acts 6:3, deacons should only be men. That is because the text reads “select from among you seven men of good reputation, full of the Spirit and of wisdom, whom we may put in charge of this task.” Acts 6:1-6 records the choice of “the seven” to diaconal service. While it does not use the technical term and noun “deacon” for their status or work, it surely provides the background to and informs the content of the New Testament office of deacon. (The Greek verb from which we get the English word deacon, to serve, is used in 6:2.) The question is, should we read this passage as descriptive of the early church or prescriptive for all churches? If we read it as prescriptive, then how does one deal with Romans 16:1, where the word often translated deacon is used of Phoebe (a woman)? Phoebe is referred to as a “servant of the church” (a specific church), which would seem to point to a diaconal role. Moreover, the description of her ministry in Romans 16:2 fits well with the type of ministry associated with New Testament deacons.

Fifth, the qualifications for deacons do not require the “ability to teach” (1 Timothy 3:2), which is a requirement given to men as pastor/elders. To be clear, I believe that the pattern of the New Testament presents the case pastoral ministry is limited to men (1 Timothy 3:2; Titus 1:6). That is much easier to argue than the case for deacons as men only. Even the Baptist Faith and Message (2000), the conservative standard of doctrine for Southern Baptist Churches makes this clear, arguing that the “…scriptural officers are pastors and deacons. While both men and women are gifted for service in the church, the office of pastor is limited to men as qualified by Scripture.”

The Contextual Considerations

Depending on what tradition you were raised in, you’re probably already inclined to lean toward a specific position regarding women as deacons. However, this should not be decided from our preference or tradition; it’s up to the Word. Personally, I believe that God’s word is authoritative. As the Baptist Faith and Message (2000) reads, “The Holy Bible was written by men divinely inspired and is God’s revelation of Himself to man. It is a perfect treasure of divine instruction. It has God for its author, salvation for its end, and truth, without any mixture of error, for its matter.”

Yet, even while we agree that the Word is the final authority, the Word is not entirely clear or explicit in this instance. While one’s tradition may lean towards a certain understanding, conservative biblical scholars are on both sides of this issue. What is clear? The primary focus of deacon ministry is centered on the service-oriented and administrative tasks primarily related to the physical needs of the church, allowing the pastors/elders (called men) to be fully devoted to the spiritual needs of the church. This is why I argued, “…it’s possible for women to serve as deacons in some settings.”

Why the qualifier “some” settings? In many Southern Baptist churches, the deacons serve as quasi-elders or a board of directors. In these cases, the deacons play a significant leadership role in the church that blurs the lines between pastor/elder and deacon. In these cases, I would argue that women should probably not serve in a deacon capacity. In other cases where the men serve as pastor/elders, and the role of pastor/elder and deacon is clearly differentiated, I think women can and should serve as deacons. Even if your church holds to deacons as men only view, I would challenge you to consider how women are serving the body. I would be willing to bet (no, I don’t gamble), many of the women are already serving in a deacon-like manner.

The central issue here, and how we answer the question, should women serve as deacons, must be shaped and limited by the word of God. All of us would recognize that we approach the word of God with assumptions, presuppositions, biases, historical understandings, and personal filters. There are Southern Baptist Churches that limit the role of deacon to men, there are other Southern Baptist Churches that have men serving as elder/pastors, and both men and women serving as deacons. This is why it is important to consider the context of the church, and why humility, openness, and community become so important in discussions like these.

Further Resources 

August 27, 2017 at 11:35 pm Leave a comment

The 2017 Together for Adoption National Conference

download.pngI am thankful to be one of the speakers at the 2017 Together for Adoption National Conference in Atlanta, GA (September 29th-30th). The focus of the conference is “the image of God, the gospel, and the orphan”. During the conference, we will explore what the implications of being made in the image of God have on adoption, fostercare, and orphancare.

You can register for the conference here. The speakers include Kevin Ezell, Dan Cruver, Rick Morton, Jason Kovacs, and others.

July 26, 2017 at 9:21 am Leave a comment

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